Culture & Religion United States

Polarized Politics in America: A Look at Political “Self-Segregation”

The social fabric of the American dream imagines a comprehensive determination; of the equality embedded within struggle and empathetic unity. Rejecting the hierarchies and aristocratic tendencies of the old world, America is a beacon of opportunity, a national community of individual righteousness, dependent on a diverse yet equal community of analogous ambitions. This manufactured ideal ignores the extensive reign of segregation as a defining facet of American history a feature of immense influence penetrating through modern American culture, society, media, and politics.

Evident within the context of political polarization, the rigid social and political divisions that characterize American livelihood, act as an immense rejection of national brotherhood; a portrait of modernity within the conscious decisions of ideological separation and association. The seizure of such divisive social patterns to capitalist concerns pronounces the relevance of declining community ideals, with companies building business atop the discomfort of a broad political demographic.

Following Paul Chabot’s second unsuccessful bid for California’s 31st congressional district, (confirmation of declining support for conservative ideologies) Chabot was motivated to curate a community of an entirely conservative populace. Chabot’s company, Conservative Move, addresses the absence of gross support for the principles of conservatism. Stationed in Northern Texas, the company promises a revised portrait of the American dream. Resting atop the foundations of an antiquated commercial American livelihood, are the covenants of “great schools, safe streets, and well paying jobs.”

Maintaining the values of promised American quintessence with an exclusive and idealistic execution, Conservative Move rejects the core notion of inherent American community, pursuing instead, the ease of chosen ignorance; an active haven for the isolated ideologies of conservatism.

Disney engineered such a model within EPCOT, an acronymous illustration of the desire to divide into a functioning utopia. Translating to, Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, EPCOT confirms, on an immense scale of commercial success, that America craves the genuine fantasy of an idealist self portrait. Adhering to the mandatory segregation necessary to enact such a fantasy, is the infamous fight over who belongs and who doesn’t, bringing America further from where it should be as a beacon of hope, while supporting segregation as commonplace

Stemming from The Bible, the “city upon a hill” image, originally used as a model of christianity, has translated into a modern statement of innate, rigidly American superiority. Expressed as a perpetual American attribute by politicians, the governance of the country is built atop a foundation of imagination and righteous innovation, ignored by the following measures of segregation. Maintaining a scope of ignorance regarding the country’s dense history of division, has done nothing but encourage the continuation of this prospect, as is evident within the modern means of disunion.

This evolved desire to self segregate within the confines of associating ideology, illustrates the antiquated profile of America through the proven falsehoods of its promises compared to the genuine condition of the country.  The desire for political safe havens expressed within the convictions of Conservative Move, the commercial success of EPCOT, and the incessant “city upon a hill” motif, illustrate the urgency at which ideological similarity is coveted, suggesting the necessity that is historical and constitutional reevaluation.

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